Archive for the ‘Nibbling on The Empire’ Category


Against the wishes of most western farmers, and in defiance of laws that they are sworn to uphold, Stephen Harper and his Conservatives are poised to destroy the Canadian Wheat Board. In truly Orwellian fashion, the Tories describe this as “democracy,” all the while invoking closure on Parliamentary debate and refusing to hold the farmers’ plebiscite that is required by federal law before any such major change can be made to the status of the CWB.

The CWB has been a bone of contention in farm policy circles for decades. While a loud minority of western grain producers have been clamoring for an end to the CWB monopoly on wheat and barley exports, most farmers continue to support the Board, as evidenced by several CWB Board of Directors election results and a recent CWB-sponsored plebiscite. The reason for the Board’s enduring support is that it works for farmers, as opposed to private grain companies who exist to maximize profits for their shareholders.

Urban Canadians have yet to wake up to this issue, though this is starting to happen. The Council of Canadians is prominent in the coalition of organizations leading the fightback. What we city slickers need to get our heads around is that this is, first and foremost, a battle for democracy. It is a struggle against growing corporate control of our food and the relentless corporatization of agriculture that is destroying rural communities.

One one level, the issues are complex. You can get a crash course by watching the video I produced along with my WCTV colleague Ken Harasym. Follow that up with visits to the web sites listed below and you will be well on your way.

On another level, it is very simple: like us, farmers are part of the 99%. We gotta stick together. Occupy that, Stephen Harper!

Links

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On Thursday, George W. Bush and former U.S. president Bill Clinton (himself an accomplished war criminal) will be attending the Surrey Regional Economic Summit at the Sheraton Vancouver Guildford Hotel. Here’s some information from the Canadian Peace Alliance on what you can do to support Bush’s arrest for war crimes.


» Report George W. Bush as a person likely to try to enter Canada contrary to section 35 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.

The Canadian Border Service Agency runs a Border Watch Toll-free line. Their website advertises:
“If you have information about suspicious cross-border activity, please contact the Canada Border Services Agency Border Watch Toll-free Line at 1-888-502-9060.”

George Walker Bush, born July 6, 1945 is likely to try to cross the border into Canada on or about October 18 to 20th 2011 to attend an event in Surrey British Columbia.  Mr. Bush has admitted to authorizing and approving the widespread use of torture by the U.S. Armed Forces and the CIA.  There are reasonable grounds to believe that George W. Bush, as the President of the United States of America and Commander in Chief of the U.S. Armed Forces between 2001 and 2009, counselled, aided and abetted the commission of torture and other war crimes and crimes against humanity in Iraq, Afghanistan and other locations. Experts estimate that in Iraq alone, over a million innocent men, women and children have died as a consequence of the illegal U.S.-led war on Iraq authorized and directed by George W. Bush.

N.B. the website indicates that CBSA has discretion to provide a reward for information.
http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/security-securite/bwl-lsf-eng.html

For more information about the case to charge Bush as a war criminal please see: Lawyers Against the War

» October 20: Peaceful Rally to Protest George W Bush’s Surrey Visit

Thursday, October 20, 11:00 am
Join at the parking lot outside the Bay, Guildford Mall, SW corner of 152 St. & 104 Ave.
For info on this rally, please email stopwar@resist.ca
http://stopwarca.wordpress.com/

» Sign the Online petition to arrest George Bush:
www.amnesty.ca

»Torture victims plan to file charges when Bush enters Canada
www.stopwar.wordpress.com

» Lawyers press for Bush arrest, as #Occupy activists set to converge in Surrey
Vancouver Observer


You can follow the events on twitter: @StopWarCa and #OccupySurrey #ArrestBush

Oct. 15, 2011: Scenes from Occupy Winnipeg – and a reminder that what is now called Canada was occupied long before by the aboriginal peoples of this part of the world. It is time the descendants of the Europeans who took the land from the people who were here first do a much better job of sharing it with today’s First Nations.


Winnipeggers took to the streets October 15, 2011 as part of the international outcry against corporate greed that began with Occupy Wall Street. The Flaming Trolleys provided just the right musical foundation, and, as usual, I took my video camera along.

David McNally teaches political science at York University in Toronto and is active in many social justice movements in that city. On Sept. 24, 2011, McNally spoke at the Mondragon Bookstore and Coffee Shop as a featured presenter at Winnipeg Radical Bookfair and DYI Fest. His topic: Global Crisis – Global Resistance.

Length: 60 minutes
Camera: Paul S. Graham and Harold Shuster
Editing and Production: Paul S. Graham

The governments of Canada and the European Union are negotiating a treaty called the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement. They hope to sign it by the end of 2011.

This treaty will take power from local governments in Canada and give it to large transnational corporations headquartered in Europe. These huge companies could take over the delivery of vital public services – such as water, transit, energy and health care – whether local communities like it or not. It’s NAFTA on steroids.

The time to stop CETA is now. Paul Moist, president of the Canadian Union of Public Employees, speaking in Winnipeg on June 27th, explains.


The fight to block CETA is being led by the Canadian Union of Public Employees and the Council of Canadians. CUPE’s Paul Moist and the Council’s Maude Barlow have been crisscrossing the country in an effort to drum up opposition to this treaty. You owe it to yourself to get informed and get involved. For more information:

On June 3, 2011, when Brigette DePape, a 21-year old parliamentary page from Manitoba, pulled out a “Stop Harper” sign during the opening session of Canada’s 41st Parliament, she was escorted out of the room and quickly fired from her position.

Her solitary act of civil disobedience in resistance to the policies of the Harper government not only inspired an outpouring of support, but also called to mind another Manitoba woman, Nellie McClung. In 1912, McClung helped organize the Political Equality League and throughout the 1920s championed female suffrage and a host of measures to combat the social injustices of her time.

On June 18, 2011, a few of us took a trip over to the Manitoba Legislature to express our solidarity with Brigette DePape by bringing her message to the Nellie McClung Memorial located on the grounds of the same Legislature where Nellie won, for Canadian women, the right to vote.